nok-ind:

Sundiata Keita of Mali, The real lion king

The epic of king Sundiata Keita of Mali was the inspiration for the Disney film the lion king. However the film itself just scratched the surface of the richness in culture, heritage and history of the actual story.

‘David Winiewski’s 1992 picture book version of the african epic “Sundiata, Lion king of Mali” and the actual historical account of the 13th century lion king, Sundiata, are both badly served by Disney’s “The lion king”. Disney has been praised for using african animals as story characters; for using the African landscape as a story setting; for using African artwork as design motifs: and for using african- american actors as the voices for the film characters. If the film succeeds in having African culture accepted by people usually resistant to recognizing any other culture but their own, then it deserves to be noted for this small breach in the racial divide. Nevertheless, in the larger sense, the film diminishes the culturally rich heritage of history and story from which it derives. Sundiata was the 12th son of the king of Mali, and he was viewed by the kings “griot” as destined for greatness. He grew to manhood in exile, but he returned to fight the evil forces of his brother and return the kingdom to it’s rightful sovereignty. The film converts the real heroes private pain and struggle against truly wrenching physical and political disabilities into a screen situation of sentimental, tearjerker shallowness. An interdisciplinary approach would allow English and social studies teachers to present the epic from a historical and literary perspective.’ (Paterno 1994)

This story belongs to be amongst epics such as Gilgamesh from Mesopotamia, ancient Greek the Iliad, Aeneid of Italy and the wonderful story of Beowulf from Anglo-saxon literature.

This is a story of a True king who founded the west African kingdom of Mali an empire whose marvels left a bright heritage of culture, riches enlightenment and ancient wisdom. Infact one of the pearls of this empire Timbuktu, many times over ignited the imagination of western explorers and ironically this same splendour prompted European exploration of the west coast of Africa.

The most notable things from this empire Sundiata, Mansa Musa, Timbuktu, Gold, Islam, Ancient manuscripts, International trade and Commerce.

references :

Paterno, Domenica R.The True Lion King of Africa: The Epic History of Sundiata, King of Old Mali.Education Resources information Center.1994

http://812studio.com/i-love-these-posters/

iridescent1:

#anchorsaway #boat #ship #navalbase #phtography #photography

iridescent1:

#anchorsaway #boat #ship #navalbase #phtography #photography

iridescent1:

Old #sign. #photography #photographer

iridescent1:

Old #sign. #photography #photographer

jossieposie:

Tonight’s read. So excited to start this beauty.  Book 1 was so good! #ya #books #reading #booklove #booknerdigans #bookstagram #booktube #booktuber #youtube #cassandraroseclarke

jossieposie:

Tonight’s read. So excited to start this beauty. Book 1 was so good! #ya #books #reading #booklove #booknerdigans #bookstagram #booktube #booktuber #youtube #cassandraroseclarke

allakinwande:

"Racism and Science Fiction"  by Samuel R. Delany
From NYRSF Issue 120, August 1998. “Racism in SF” first appeared in volume form  in Darkmatter, edited by Sheree R. Thomas, Warner Books: New York, 2000. Posted by Permission of Samuel R. Delany. Copyright © 1998 by Samuel R. Delany ____________________________________ For better or for worse, I am often spoken of as the first African-American science fiction writer. But I wear that originary label as uneasily as any writer has worn the label of science fiction itself. Among the ranks of what is often referred to as proto-science fiction, there are a number of black writers. M. P. Shiel, whose Purple Cloud and Lord of the Sea are still read, was a Creole with some African ancestry. Black leader Martin Delany (1812–1885—alas, no relation) wrote his single and highly imaginative novel, still to be found on the shelves of Barnes & Noble today, Blake, or The Huts of America (1857), about an imagined successful slave revolt in Cuba and the American South—which is about as close to an sf-style alternate history novel as you can get. Other black writers whose work certainly borders on science fiction include Sutton E. Griggs and his novel Imperio Imperium (1899) in which an African-American secret society conspires to found a separate black state by taking over Texas, and Edward Johnson, who, following Bellamy’s example in Looking Backward (1888), wrote Light Ahead for the Negro (1904), telling of a black man transported into a socialist United States in the far future. I believe I first heard Harlan Ellison make the point that we know of dozens upon dozens of early pulp writers only as names: They conducted their careers entirely by mail—in a field and during an era when pen-names were the rule rather than the exception. Among the “Remmington C. Scotts” and the “Frank P. Joneses” who litter the contents pages of the early pulps, we simply have no way of knowing if one, three, or seven or them—or even many more—were not blacks, Hispanics, women, native Americans, Asians, or whatever. Writing is like that. More-@http://www.nyrsf.com/racism-and-science-fiction-.htm

allakinwande:

"Racism and Science Fiction"
by Samuel R. Delany

From NYRSF Issue 120, August 1998. “Racism in SF” first appeared in volume form
in Darkmatter, edited by Sheree R. Thomas, Warner Books: New York, 2000.
Posted by Permission of Samuel R. Delany. Copyright © 1998 by Samuel R. Delany
____________________________________
For better or for worse, I am often spoken of as the first African-American science fiction writer. But I wear that originary label as uneasily as any writer has worn the label of science fiction itself. Among the ranks of what is often referred to as proto-science fiction, there are a number of black writers. M. P. Shiel, whose Purple Cloud and Lord of the Sea are still read, was a Creole with some African ancestry. Black leader Martin Delany (1812–1885—alas, no relation) wrote his single and highly imaginative novel, still to be found on the shelves of Barnes & Noble today, Blake, or The Huts of America (1857), about an imagined successful slave revolt in Cuba and the American South—which is about as close to an sf-style alternate history novel as you can get. Other black writers whose work certainly borders on science fiction include Sutton E. Griggs and his novel Imperio Imperium (1899) in which an African-American secret society conspires to found a separate black state by taking over Texas, and Edward Johnson, who, following Bellamy’s example in Looking Backward (1888), wrote Light Ahead for the Negro (1904), telling of a black man transported into a socialist United States in the far future. I believe I first heard Harlan Ellison make the point that we know of dozens upon dozens of early pulp writers only as names: They conducted their careers entirely by mail—in a field and during an era when pen-names were the rule rather than the exception. Among the “Remmington C. Scotts” and the “Frank P. Joneses” who litter the contents pages of the early pulps, we simply have no way of knowing if one, three, or seven or them—or even many more—were not blacks, Hispanics, women, native Americans, Asians, or whatever. Writing is like that.
More-@
http://www.nyrsf.com/racism-and-science-fiction-.htm

poc-creators:

Science Fiction and Fantasy by POC writers Part 3

Writing lets you have the one thing that society offers in theory and obliterates in practice—self determination
Zadie Smith, 2013 Troy Lecture, “Why Write?” University of Massachusetts, Amherst, December 5, 2013 (via asakiyume)
Call for Papers!

transontheinternet:

CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS - Round 2
Trans_ : An Anthology of Trans People and the Internet
Submissions are sought for a new anthology on trans people and the Internet. The working title at this time is Trans_ : An Anthology of Trans People and the Internet.

Editors: Mitch Kellaway, nina malaya, Harlan Kellaway
Proposal Deadline: December 1st, 2014
Final Essay Deadline: April 1st, 2015

Submissions

Trans_ is the first anthology to collect the voices and experiences of trans people speaking to how the Internet has impacted our lives and how we have impacted the Internet. We wish to capture a range of pieces from those who use, cannot use, work with, develop for, socialize on, and build community with the Internet.

What We’re Seeking in the 2nd Round of Submissions

We had a very successful and exciting first round of submissions. After reviewing them and making decisions, we are doing a second round with a greater focus on ensuring we have a diverse array of both topics and contributors.

In this round, we would like to specifically encourage trans women (esp. of colour), trans feminine people, and anyone else belonging to the group of people impacted by transmisogyny to contribute.

Additionally, we would love to receive more submissions from marginalized groups — people of colour (of any gender); sex workers; disabled, poor, rural, fat, elder, trans people; and more — in order to create an anthology as complex and expansive as the community itself.

Note: Submissions from all trans people will still be accepted for consideration; however, we’re keen to see and work with submissions coming from the groups named above.

Read More

iridescent1:

I want to see #beauty in everything. #urbangems #pavementtreasures #beautywhereyoufindit #brokenglass #sidewalk #citylife

iridescent1:

I want to see #beauty in everything. #urbangems #pavementtreasures #beautywhereyoufindit #brokenglass #sidewalk #citylife

Dream log 9.18.2014 - Owls

i remember doing a lot of walking up stairs, down stairs, through new city streets i have never been to.  i ended up in what seemed to be something like an apartment complex club house.  or maybe a restaurant, because there were others eating at various tables.  i was seated with a group of friends at a table in a corner with large windows that looked out to the pool.  i was seated with my back to the windows, but as i turned to look toward the pool, or maybe someone in the group told me to turn around, i saw about 15-20 owls.  big owls.  owls as big as children at about 3 feet tall.  they were playing.  some were filing into the pool.  some were interacting around the pool.  i got extremely happy.  i actually squealed in delight.  a high pitch squeal.  people in the restaurant were amused by my squeal. i was just so happy to see them and to see them being happy. i woke up feeling good.

it means a lot that the owl spirit(s) came to visit my dreams.  and they don’t usually travel in flocks like that. owls have a lot of symbolism attached to them.  intuition, change, seeing the unseen.  all very pertinent to me these days.  i feel like change, big change, change big enough to call for a flock of owls to visit me, is coming. 

iridescent1:

My #eldebarge days. #tbt #collegedays #afrolatino #afromexican #qpoc #vestgame

iridescent1:

My #eldebarge days. #tbt #collegedays #afrolatino #afromexican #qpoc #vestgame

divanoid:

yellow—ranger:

do not let white academia fool you into thinking that

  • the greatest authors that were and ever will be are white men
  • every great philosopher came out of europe
  • mathematics and science were at their highest point when used by white men
  • the most beautiful city in the world is paris
  • colonialism was a golden age
  • europe is the pinnacle of civilization

Sources timmmme.

Some Written Works (That Aren’t By White Dudes)

  • Iola Leroy (about a biracial Black woman in the antebelleum South) - Frances E.W. Harper, who was one of the first published Black authoresses
  • The Space Traders (a very relevant short about Black life/value in less-than-utopian America) - Derrick Bell, Black sci-fi author
  • Thiruppavai (Tamil Vaishnava verses by the 12 Alvars, or poet-saints) - Andal, the only woman among them. These are still recited in South India during Margazhi
  • The Other Side of Paradise (memoir of) - Staceyann Chin, whose identity as Black-Chinese and lesbian in Jamaica is definitely worth reading about
  • Brown Girl in the Ring (post-apocalyptic Toronto WHERE PoC survive, featuring voudoun!) - Nalo Hopkinson; check it all out
  • The Bluest Eye - Toni Morrison, Black American novelist, Peace Prize winner and quality human being
  • Ninth Ward (children’s novel of Katrina through a black girl’s perspective) - Jewell Parker Rhodes
  • The Island of a Thousand Mirrors (about two families caught in the Tamil-Sinhala divide, based on her experience during the civil war) - Nayomi Munaweera, Sri Lankan author. VERY AMAZE.

Philosophers

  • Frantz Fanon, Caribbean philosopher/revolutionary who dedicated much time to decrying colonization, fighting oppression and telling white folks OFF; works include Black Skins, White Masks, Wretched of the Earth, and National Culture and the Fight for Freedom
  • En Hedu’ana, Sumerian en-priestess whose poetry composed one of the first written belief systems; also an accomplished astronomer
  • Ban Zhou, 1st-century Chinese historian, author (Lessons for Women, co-published The Book of Han)  and court advisor who advocated for domestic equality and women’s education. Her Confucian ideals were present in most written works

Playwrights

  • Zitkala-Sa, Native (Sioux) author (Old Indian LegendsAmerican Indian Stories), musician and activist who co-wrote The Sun Dance in 1913, an opera which showcased her knowledge of Ute and Sioux harmonies and composition. It was the first of its kind, featuring many indigenous performers
  • Yukio Mishima, Japanese author famous for Confessions of a Mask; also genius playwright who created Five Modern Noh Plays
  • Lorraine HansberryBlack (queer) playwright whose works SHOULD be acclaimed the world over (A Raisin in the SunThe Sign in Sidney Brustein’s Window)

Mathematicians/Scientists/Innovators

  • Muhammad Musa al-Khwarizmi (origin of ‘algorithm’), 8th-century Persian scholar, creator of algebra and pioneer of the quadratic equation; one of the first to use zero as a placeholder, his research brought Hindu-Arabic numerals and decimals into the West
  • Banu Musa [Ahmad, Muhammad and Hasan], a trio of Persian brothers/mechanics/mathematicians who wrote The Book of Ingenious Devices in 850: an illustrated guide on more than 100 tools and their use (from early feedback controllers to valves and float chambers; steampunk gods, I say)
  • 15th century Korea - first “turtleboats”
  • Garrett Morgan, Black inventor credited for the first traffic signal and patented gas mask in the ‘20’s
  • Sarah E. Goode, inventor and the first Black woman to earn a U.S. patent, for the folding cabinet bed so prominent in the late 1800’s and early-mid 1900’s
  • Madam C.J. Walker, Black entrepreneur and inventor famously known for her scalp conditioners, hair growth and beauty products; first woman millionaire in America (YAAAS)
  • Mary Kenner, creative Black patenter whose contributions range from the toilet-tissue holder to the sanitary belt (thank youuu!!)
  • Marie Van Brittan Brown, Black inventor of the closed circuit TV security patent (basis for modern surveillance, traffic control)
  • Philip Emeagwali, Nigerian scientist/inventor that innovated a supercomputer for petroleum fields analysis
  • 7th century India - invention of chess
  • Gebisa Ejeta, Ethiopian geneticist/agriculturist who invented the first drought-tolerant sorghum hybrid in Sudan; is now on the  Board for International Food and Agricultural Development
  • Benjamin Banneker, Black astronomer and mathematician who made America’s first functioning clock, y’all
  • David Unaipon, famous Aboriginal preacher/inventor who provided basis for modern shears and the centrifugal motor
  • 12th century China - first magnetic compass
  • Ellen Ochoa, Chicana scientist who invented optical analysis systems and was the world’s first Latina astronaut
  • Prafulla Chandra Ray, Indian chemist and entrepreneur who made first chemical factory in the country FROM HIS HOUSE; founded Bengal Chemical and Pharmaceutical Works
  • Sandrine Mubenga, Congolese engineer working on solar-powered villages and fuel-cell hybrid car (women in STEM!)
  • Shirley Jackson, kick-ass Black physicist, inventor and president at Rensselaer Polytechnic. She can be credited for the touch-tone telephone, the portable fax, and caller ID
  • Tony Hansberry, the youngest on this list; his innovation on endo switches drastically cut the performance time for hysterectomies (open-heart surgery).

So…what’s up, white academia? Where’s the accolades for them?

Julie Dillon

"My name is Julie Dillon and I’m the creator of Imagined Realms: Book 1, which is the first in a series of annual art books that I am illustrating and self-publishing. Each book contains 10 all-new illustrations made exclusively for each book!

I got into art because I love to create, to see the world in new ways, and to stir the imagination of others. I have long wanted to start putting together my own books and work on more personal projects. “Imagined Realms” gives me the opportunity to spend more time creating my own illustrations and projects, and also gives me the chance to create more illustrations that feature positive and diverse representations of women.

Each book will have it’s own theme. The art in Book 1 is all fantasy themed, and Book 2 (which is currently in development) will be science fiction themed.

I am launching this Kickstarter to pay for the cost of getting the books printed. It will also give me the ability to create the content for Book 2. Currently, the print book will be available exclusively through kickstarter.”

- Julie Dillon

Imagined Realms: Book 1 - New Fantasy Art by Julie Dillon